Ft. Hood’s Masquerading Terrorist

I stand in awe of our military and their sacrifice! Their families are heros too. The Ft. Hood murderer was the attack of a terrorist like 9/11 — this time he had been masquerading in a patriot’s uniform. Masquerading distorts the perspective not only of the deceived but of the perpetrator.

There are sad similarities to the murderous mindset of Waffen-SS commando Otto Skorzeny  during the 1944 Battle of the Bulge. German soldiers wore captured U.S. Army uniforms, armed with U.S. weapons caused havoc when the commandos launched their mission behind Allied lines. The devastation in the soldiers’ soul was far worse. The attack didn’t go well and on 17 December Skorzeny was ordered to assemble south of Malmedy, France. The spearhead tank group spotted an American convoy and opened fire, and with only small arms to defend themselves, the Americans were forced to surrender.

These prisoners were taken to a field, where others captured by the SS earlier in the day joined them. Approximately 120 unarmed men were gathered in the field and murdered as autopsies later revealed that at least 40 victims had suffered fatal gunshot wounds to the head and half of those with small caliber pistols.

massacre_de_malmedy_23-0224a-1

New POW massacres were again reported on December 18, 19 and 20, and German troops also massacred over 100 Belgian civilians. Terrorists’ Twisted thinking  led to the murder of men, women and children.

The “Malmedy massacre trial” could not be precise in the number of prisoners of war and civilians massacred. Some reported as many as 749 POWs killed. A U.S. Senate subcommittee accounted for 362 POWs and 111 civilians. That is a lot of terror and murder however it is calculated!

A Tribunal tried more than 70 persons and the Court pronounced 43 death sentences, 22 life sentences, and 8 others were sentenced to shorter prison terms. Fair enough! Disputed later in the U.S. by congressmen from heavily German-American areas the case was appealed to the Supreme Court, which was unable to make a decision. And justice for all?

Twisted thinking continued after the “fog of war” even in the minds of some American people and our Court. None of the death sentences was carried out! Most of the death sentences were commuted. The life sentences were commuted within the next few years. All the convicted war criminals were released during the 1950s the last one to leave prison  in December 1956 – just 12 years after the terrorist’s attacks.

Does this give you any insight to the flawed justice offered to foreign terrorist Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, or on the other hand, to what lies ahead for American terrorist Army Major Nidal Malik Hasan? Major Hasan faces 13 counts of premeditated murder and could face the death penalty for his alleged shooting of 12 unarmed soldiers and a civilian at a Ft. Hood processing center. Do you think?

Does the administration, the government, the military, and the American people not yet understand terrorism, war or even law and order?

People celebrated because the alleged terrorists, Major Hasan, was not killed and interrogation would uncovered the answer to “Why did he do it?” Really? Why is it that Major Nidal Malik Hasan’s motive is crystal clear to me? He contends that he is a Muslim – first. I contend that I am a Christian first before I’m a South Carolinian. What’s the difference? Simple.

Every patriot realizes that any ideology or religious view that subscribes to murder or terrorism needs to be extinguished! There is nothing civil or criminal about it. It’s plain and simple – it’s terrorism masquerading as crime or religion!

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